Wednesday, October 14, 2009

Aria Resort & Casino at CITYCENTER Las Vegas to open in December and feature world's best hotel technologies

ARIA Resort & Casino and Mandarin Oriental Hotels in the new Las Vegas CityCenter Project are the first in the USA to debut a spectacular level of technological innovation for their guests.

A WiFi City:

CityCenter will soon complete the world’s largest Distributed Antenna System with over 6,500 antennas and over 2,900 wireless access points to cover the entire CityCenter campus.

New Guestroom Technologies:

CityCenter and Control4 Corporation have developed personalized “smart” automation for every guestroom at the Aria and the Mandarin Oriental, an innovation previously available only in select high-end resort suites and residential locations. Every guestroom device is networked via one gigabit of bandwidth.

The room will recognize a first visit and “greet” guests as they enter with lighting and parting of curtains to showcase the hotel’s spectacular city or mountain views. The TV will turn on to display a list of automated controls for guests to personalize.

The system also provides one-touch remote control of lighting, room temperature, television/video systems, music, wake-up calls, draperies and requests for services. The nightstand contains a seven-inch panel with touch-screen technology that navigates the same room settings as the remote control.

RFID unlocks the door by passing the key card over a sensor.

All rooms feature a 42-inch LCD HDTV with laptop and other device connectivity as well as access to room controls. The TV also acts as a communications center for the room.

The ARIA Resort & Casino opens in December.

Las Vegas CityCenter

Please Note: ARIA and Vdara hotels are the sponsors of our Technology Report CES Coverage for CES 2010.

4 comments:

Vegastoday said...

Thanks cant wait!

FleaStiff said...

I'm not sure I want the curtains parting in a salute as I enter the room for the first time. Sure hope they don't part automaticaly if my companion's first-entry is a few hours later.

It is thought that the massive CityCenter will bleed other strip hotels but not generate any new visitors to Vegas. Whether CityCenter will capture and retain an upscale market is unknown.

Building a big-box casino has been profitable on the Strip, but all good things come to an end and no one is certain whether CityCenter is the last in line.

Joseph Hunkins said...

Flea I think there's a lot of control, so don't worry about any unintended exposures!

Interesting notion that this won't increase total visits, just spread them more thinly among more properties.

Perhaps, but the history of Las Vegas suggests that demand has tended to scale up to meet the supply.

FleaStiff said...

>history of Las Vegas suggests
>demand has tended to meet supply.
Yes. And its often happened amidst some doom and gloom naysayers who've predicted that such excess room capacity would only parasitize the existing customer base.
Its quite possible that visitors and The Drop will soon rebound.
Lately however rooms have been given away to anyone with a pulse as prices for rooms have plummeted and comps have become more generous. There is a time lag as rooms are constructed and when times do get better, properties that already have rooms will profit the most from it rather than those casinos that have to scramble to build.
I know that CityCenter hopes the rooms will be fully rented at upscale prices and that the naysayers are wrong. I hope so to. Its just that with all the layoffs from casinos, I'm fairly certain the slowdown is real.